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Hi, my main discussion today is about how to submit something as ideas or discoveries if made by me to the world, I think there may be a website out there to help in such problems if you know about something like that, then please help!!!

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That's a great discussion that you have started, and a complex one to help with. I could Google for a “recreational mathematics journal”, but that wouldn't tell you anything that you can't find out on your own. I commend you for realising that you are capable of making a significant discovery in the field of mathematics. Some teachers have forgotten that that is possible, and believe that mathematics has been unchanged for centuries. New discoveries continue to be made, in Fractals, for example. It's a myth that significant discoveries are made by lone researchers. More discoveries are the result of teamwork. So, you are more likely to make a new discovery if you work in a team with your classmates. Inventors in mathematics, or any subject need to be good communicators. You could practice explaining mathematics problems in your classroom, and on online forums, such as mathematics24x7.ning.com. If you explain your ideas to others, they can point out your mistakes. It is unusual to be right first time. Once I got an email from a mathematics student who had discovered a new theory. He believed that the number π (pi) was exactly equal to 3.0, and he could prove it. I suspect that there was a flaw in his calculations. If he had worked in a team, they would have been able to review the work together, and discover their error. Sometimes you have a “new” idea that has been discovered before. That does not diminish your creativity, if you thought of it independently. You need to ask around, to find out if your discovery is novel. Write a project report describing your discovery, using graphs or diagrams to explain it. Ask someone to review the report and suggest corrections, before you publish it. Where you publish it depends on the mathematics topic. Don't overlook your local newspaper or school/college magazine or blog. Present your ideas step-by-step in a slide show, and upload it to SlideShare.net. I did some geometry research, and published it on http://i2geo.net where it is easily found among related teaching material, but I did not get any feedback yet. You should not be too disappointed if your research is ignored. I did get some feedback by email from mathematics enthusiasts on my contact list. It will take time for your ideas to mature, and for you to find the best way of publishing them. If you are at school, personal research should not distract you from your planned curriculum. Ask your teacher to advise you how to manage your time between course work and mathematics research. Also find out if there is a way to get credit points for your research, by doing it as a project in class. I hope that you make new and significant discoveries. Small discoveries are valid too, e.g. a better solution to a mathematics problem. Your teachers and parents can often give more reliable advice than you will find on the Internet.
Hello Shahzad.

The Association of Teachers of Mathematics is a friendly association of teachers of mathematics, run by teachers to enable teachers support each other. It has a journal called Mathematics Teaching which exists so that teachers have a place they can publish their ideas. The editors are very helpful an supportive. I'm not sure if you have to pay to join to be able to publish, but you can e-mail the editor and ask. If you do join you get the journal and access to lots of useful stuff.

http://www.atm.org.uk/

Good luck with your idea.
Shahzad, I have not found there is one place to go to showcase new discoveries in mathematics. Math is too big and fragmented, and solidified as a discipline, particularly in the educational field. I would question Colins statement about " the myth that significant discoveries are made by lone researchers." Like any discovery, it starts from individual insight and then usually it takes many people over much time to give it full expression for the potential of that idea. By the time an idea is accepted at higher levels in a discipline it has been argued over, grouped, appropriated and classified to fit in some way to what is already in place. With any innovation it takes time for people to get comfortable to look at what they are doing in a new way. If you are working independently it is best to go to teachers or people in the field to get their interested and support. Any new idea is at first ignored and often rejected. That is simply a mechanism for keeping stability to what has already been established, and often to protect what people have become comfortable with.

I encourage you to explore all the ways that makes sense to you to get the interest of people that may support what you are doing. If your idea has value it will eventually be be acknowledge. Keep on it Shahzad. Without know what you have in mind, we need people like you, there are too few willing to think deeply and originally about anything these days,
Bradford, regarding my comment "It's a myth that significant discoveries are made by lone researchers." I picked up that opinion from a recent news article (I can't recall which one) reviewing the book "Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History Of Innovation" by Steven Johnson. There's a related interview "Kevin Kelly and Steven Johnson on Where Ideas Come From" in Wired.com.

Personally, I've spent most of my life working in software development teams, so there's no product I've worked on that's exclusively mine. I did some lone research on geometry recently, and that was very satisfying. My best geometry ideas didn't happen in a vacuum, but in collaborative work, some of which I did on mathematics24x7, particularly "Largest Semicircle Inscribable in a Unit Square".
You might want to try sending your research article to mathematical societies. I'm not sure about societies in Europe or Asia but the U.S. has the American Mathematical Society, the Mathematical Association of America, plus others.

Or Nctm.org, if you are in the U.S.
Rebecca Hanson said:
Hello Shahzad.

The Association of Teachers of Mathematics is a friendly association of teachers of mathematics, run by teachers to enable teachers support each other. It has a journal called Mathematics Teaching which exists so that teachers have a place they can publish their ideas. The editors are very helpful an supportive. I'm not sure if you have to pay to join to be able to publish, but you can e-mail the editor and ask. If you do join you get the journal and access to lots of useful stuff.

http://www.atm.org.uk/

Good luck with your idea.
You may want to submit your work to planetmath.org. You do have copyright to what you submit.

http://www.planetmath.org/

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